Understanding Africa Myth 3 : Africa has no cities

Africa currently has one of the fastest urbanization rates in the world. Currently almost 50% of Africans live in cities these are the largest cities in Africa

Africa has three megacities Lagos, Cairo, Johannesburg

  1. Lagos 25 million

 

 

(Yoruba: Èkó) is the largest city in the Nigerian state of Lagos and also the largest in Nigeria. It is the second fastest growing urban area on the African continent, after Abuja,[11] and one of the most populous urban agglomerations in the world.[12] Lagos is a major financial centre in Africa; the mega city has the highest GDP,[4] and also houses one of the largest and busiest ports on the continent.[13]

Lagos initially emerged as a port city which originated on a collection of islands, which are contained in the present day LGAs of Lagos Island, Eti-Osa, Amuwo-Odofin and Apapa; the islands are separated by creeks, fringing the southwest mouth of Lagos Lagoon, while protected from the Atlantic Ocean by barrier islands and long sand spits such as Bar Beach, which stretch up to 100 kilometres (60 miles) east and west of the mouth. Due to rapid urbanization, the city expanded to the west of the lagoon to include areas in the present day Lagos Mainland, Ajeromi-Ifelodun, and Surulere. This led to the classification of Lagos into two main areas – the Island, which was the initial city of Lagos, before it expanded into the area known as the Mainland.[14] This city area was governed directly by the Federal Government through the Lagos City Council, until the creation of Lagos State in 1967, which led to the splitting of Lagos city into the present day seven Local Government Areas(LGAs), and an addition of other towns (which now make up 13 LGAs) from the then Western Region, to form the state.[15]

Lagos which was the capital of Nigeria since its amalgamation in 1914, went on to become the capital of Lagos State, after its creation. However, the state capital was later moved to Ikeja in 1976, while the federal capital also moved to Abuja in 1991. Even though Lagos is still widely referred to as a city, the present day Lagos, also known as “Metropolitan Lagos”, and officially as “Lagos Metropolitan Area”[16][17][18] is an urban agglomeration or conurbation,[19] which consists of 16 out of Lagos State’s 20 LGAs, including Ikeja, the state capital.[20][4] This conurbation makes up 37% of Lagos State’s total land area, but houses about 85% of the state’s total population.[21] As a result, Lagos remains the financial centre of the country, and a major financial centre on the continent.[15][4]

The exact population of Metropolitan Lagos is disputed; however, the National Bureau of Statistics in 2015 estimates the population of the area at approximately 21 million.[3][15][22] As of 2014, the Lagos Metropolitan Area is the largest in Africa and one of the largest in the world.[23]

A port on the Atlantic Ocean and the most populous city in Nigeria, Lagos is a metropolitan area that originated on islands separated by creeks. It is the commercial and industrial hub of Nigeria, and unlike the rest of the country, 90% of the population of Lagos have access to electricity,

 

  • Largest city in Nigeria and Africa
  • According to the UN it will be third Largest city in the world after Mumbai, and Tokyo by 2015
  • Fastest growing megacity (City over 10 million) Worlds 7thfastest growing city
  • Home of Nollywood, worlds second largest movie industry after Bollywood.Home of NollywoodWorlds second largest film industryNollywood makes about 2,400 films per year,
  • Lagos is made up of various islands connected by bridges
  • The Third Mainland Bridge Connected Mainland Lagos with one of the island districts is 12 km in length, making it one of the longest bridges in the world

Worlds Largest Construction Project Eko Atlantic

Lagos is Nigeria’s financial capital

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Started in 2012 is a planned district of LagosNigeria, being constructed on land reclaimed from the Atlantic Ocean.[1] It is located on Lagos’ Bar Beach. Upon completion, the new island which is still under development is anticipating 400,000 residents and a daily flow of 250,000 commuters

Lagos has a thriving art and music scene

Darey Love like a Movie 7

Source : jessiekonko.blogspot.com

Lagos has made many changes in the past

10 years

Makoko slum in Lagos, Nigeria

Makoko slum in Lagos, Nigeria - 2014

Flyover in Lagos Nigeria, pictured in 2005

Flyover in Lagos Nigeria, pictured in 2015

 

Lagos is also home to the world’s largest church and internet cafe

Richest areas- Banana Island $ 2 million (Average house cost), Ikoyi

Poorest areas- Oshodi, Makoko Village

Lagos is one of the world’s most crowded cities

Lagos Crowded

  • Lagos is made up of various islands connected by bridges

  • The Third Mainland Bridge Connected Mainland Lagos with one of the island districts is 12 km in length, making it one of the longest bridges in the world

 

 

  • The city is home to some very wealthy people and very poor people as well.

 

 

  • Makoko is a slum in Lagos that has become the worlds largest water village with 85,000

 

 

Nollywood

Lamata

lagos-light-rail-2

Eko Atlantic

 

 

  • Started in 2012 is a planned district of LagosNigeria, being constructed on land reclaimed from the Atlantic Ocean.[1]It is located on Lagos’ Bar Beach. Upon completion, the new island which is still under development is anticipating 400,000 residents and a daily flow of 250,000 commuters. Standing on 10 million square metres of land reclaimed from the ocean and protected by an 8.5 kilometre long sea wall, the $6 billion Eko Atlantic City will, according to its website, be the size of Manhattan’s skyscraper district. Self-sufficient and sustainable, it includes state-of-the-art urban design, its own power, clean water, advanced telecommunications, spacious roads and 110,000 trees

2. Cairo 20.4 million

Cairo city

is the capital of Egypt and the largest city in the Middle-East and second-largest in Africa after Lagos. Its metropolitan area is the 15th largest in the world. Located near the Nile Delta,[1][2] it was founded in 969 CE. Nicknamed “the city of a thousand minarets” for its preponderance of Islamic architecture, Cairo has long been a center of the region’s political and cultural life. Cairo was founded by Jawhar al-Siqilli “The Sicilian”, of the Fatimid dynasty, in the 10th century CE, but the land composing the present-day city was the site of national capitals whose remnants remain visible in parts of Old Cairo. Cairo is also associated with Ancient Egypt as it is close to the ancient cities of Memphis, Giza and Fustat which are near the Great Sphinx and the pyramids of Giza.

Egyptians today often refer to Cairo as Maṣr ([mɑsˤɾ], مصر), the Egyptian Arabic pronunciation of the name for Egypt itself, emphasizing the city’s continued role in Egyptian influence.[3][4] Its official name is القاهرة al-Qāhirah , means literally: “the Defeater”, in reference to the fact that the planet Mars (“Al Najm Al Qahir”) was rising at the time when the city was founded[citation needed] as well as, “the Vanquisher”; “the Conqueror”; Egyptian Arabic pronunciation: [elqɑ(ː)ˈheɾɑ], “the Defeater” or, ” “the Victorious” (al-Qahira) in reference to the much awaited[5] Caliph al-Mu’izz li Din Allah who arrived from the old Fatimid Ifriqiyan capital of Mahdia in 973 to the city. The Egyptian name for Cairo is said to be: Khere-Ohe, meaning: “The Place of Combat”, supposedly, in reference to a battle which took place between the Gods Seth and Horus.[6] Sometimes the city is informally also referred to as كايرو Kayro [ˈkæjɾo].[7] It is also called Umm al-Dunya, meaning “the mother of the world”.[8]

Cairo has the oldest and largest film and music industries in the Arab world,

 

as well as the world’s second-oldest institution of higher learning, al-Azhar University.

 

Many international media, businesses, and organizations have regional headquarters in the city; the Arab League has had its headquarters in Cairo for most of its existence.

 

With a population of 6.76 million[9] spread over 453 square kilometers (175 sq mi), Cairo is by far the largest city in Egypt. With an additional 10 million inhabitants just outside the city, Cairo resides at the center of the largest metropolitan area in Africa and the Arab World as well as the 18th-largest urban area in the world.[citation needed]

 

Cairo, like many other mega-cities, suffers from high levels of pollution and traffic. Cairo’s metro, one of only two metros on the African continent, ranks among the fifteen busiest in the world,[10] with over 1 billion[11] annual passenger rides. The economy of Cairo was ranked first in the Middle East[12] in 2005, and 43rd globally by Foreign Policys 2010 Global Cities Index.[13]

 

Cairo subway

 

Largest suburbs – Giza

Richest areas- Garden City, Zamalek, Maadi, Mohandessin, Heliopolis

Poorest areas- Manshiyat Nasr, Dar Al Salaam, Imbaba

,Areas with Most Africans – Ain Shams

 

 

3. Johannesburg 14.6 million (Including Pretoria) also known as Jozi, Jo’burg, eGoli, and Joeys, and abbreviated as JHB)

 

 

is the largest city in South Africa.

The world’s largest city not situated on a river, lake, or coastline, Johannesburg is the capital of Gauteng, the wealthiest province in South Africa. While Johannesburg is not one of South Africa’s three capital cities, it is the seat of the Constitutional Court and has the largest economy of any metropolitan region in Sub-Saharan Africa. The city is also the source of a large-scale gold and diamond trade, due to its location on the mineral-rich Witwatersrand range of hills.

 

It is the provincial capital of Gauteng, which is the wealthiest province in South Africa.[8] The city is one of the 50 largest urban agglomerations in the world,[9] and is also the world’s largest city not situated on a river, lake, or coastline.[10] The city was named and established in 1886 following the discovery of gold on what had been a farm. The name is attributed to one or all of three men involved in the establishment of the city. In ten years, the population was 100,000 inhabitants. While Johannesburg is not one of South Africa’s three capital cities, it is the seat of the Constitutional Court, which has the final word on interpretation of South Africa’s constitution as well as with issues in connection with constitutional matters. The city is the source of a large-scale gold and diamond trade, due to its location on the mineral-rich Witwatersrand range of hills.[citation needed]

In 2011, the population of the city of Johannesburg was 4,434,827, making it the largest city in South Africa.[11] In the same year, the population of Greater Johannesburg Metropolitan Area was 7,860,781.[12] Some view the area surrounding the city of Johannesburg yet more broadly than the metropolitan area, adding Ekurhuleni, West Rand and Lenasia; that larger area had a population of 10,267,700 in 2007.[13] The land area of the municipal city 1,645 km2 (635 sq mi) is large in comparison with those of other major cities, resulting in a moderate population density of 2,364/km2 (6,120/sq mi).

  • South Africa’s largest city
  • Largest city in the world not situated on any body of water

 

 

 

  • Johannesburg holds the title of the largest man-made forest in the world
  • Johannesburg is also one of the cheapest cities in the world to live
  • South Africa is the world’s leader in mining and minerals. It has nearly 90% of the platinum metals on earth, 80% of the manganese, 73% of the chrome, 45% of the vanadium and 41% of the gold.

Worlds largest man made forest

Tallest structure in Africa at 882 feet.

The Hillbrow Tower

Gautrain

O V Tambo Airport, busiest airport in Africa

Cradle of Mankind Museum

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Palace of the Lost City

Gold Reef City

Titel

Constitution Center

Constitution Hill Building Precinct, Johannesburg

Soccer City 2010 World Cup

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Johannesburg has more millionaires than any other city in Africa.

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Sandton has the world’s largest prada store

 

Mall of Africa

 

Melville

Johannesburg Melville

Johannesburg stock exchange

 

 

 

is the largeststock exchange in Africa. It is situated at the corner of Maude Street and Gwen Lane in Sandton, Johannesburg, South Africa. In 2003 the JSE had an estimated 472 listed companies and a market capitalisation of US$182.6 billion (€158 billion), as well as an average monthly traded value of US$6.399 billion (€5.5 billion). As of 31 December 2013, themarket capitalisation of the JSE was at US$1,007 billion.

 

 

That gives it a market capitalisation-to-GDP ratio that is the third largest in the world; only Hong Kong and Switzerland have relatively larger capital markets. Some of this is accounted for by large overseas companies cross-listing on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange, but even so, the financial sector’s size is remarkable for a country of South Africa’s size and population.

 

 

Largest suburbs – Soweto,

Richest areas- Sandton, Bryanston, Houghton

Poorest areas- Alexandra, Diepskloof, Klipton

 

4. Kinshasa 10  million

This huge, sprawling capital city is the second largest “Francophone” urban area in the world after Paris. Once a site of fishing villages, it now stretches along the Congo river and faces the capital of the neighbouring Republic of Congo, Brazzaville. It is the administrative, economic and cultural centre for DR Congo.

is the capital and the largest city of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It is located on the Congo River.

Once a site of fishing villages, Kinshasa is now an urban area with a 2014 population of over 11 million.[2] It faces the capital of the neighbouring Republic of Congo, Brazzaville, which can be seen in the distance across the wide Congo River. The city of Kinshasa is also one of the DRC’s 11 provinces. Because the administrative boundaries of the city-province cover a vast area, over 90% of the city-province’s land is rural in nature, and the urban area only occupies a small section in the far western end of the city-province.[1]

Kinshasa is the third largest urban area in Africa after Cairo and Lagos.[2] It is also the second largest “francophone” urban area in the world after Paris, French being the language of government, schools, newspapers, public services and high-end commerce in the city, while Lingala is used as a lingua franca in the street.[4] If current demographic trends continue, Kinshasa should surpass Paris in population around 2020.[

Richest areas- Cite du Fleuve

Poorest areas- Masina

5. Luanda 7 million

Following decades of civil war it has become the country’s primary port and major industrial, cultural and urban centre. Getting rich off revenue from oil and other natural resources, the government has ploughed big money into construction in the city.

is the capital city of Angola, and the country’s most populous and important city, primary port and major industrial, cultural and urban centre. Located on Angola’s coast with the Atlantic Ocean, Luanda is both Angola’s chief seaport and its administrative centre. It has a metropolitan population of over 6 million. It is also the capital city of Luanda Province, and the world’s third most populous Portuguese-speaking city, behind only São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, both in Brazil, and the most populous Portuguese-speaking capital city in the world, ahead of Brasília, Maputo and Lisbon.

The city is currently undergoing a major reconstruction, with many large developments taking place that will alter the cityscape significantly

Richest areas- Talatona, Maianga, Luanda Sul

Poorest areas- North Luanda

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The City’s growth has to do with the country’s big boom in Oil. Here are Sonangol headquarters the largest company in Sub Saharan Africa at $22 billion

 

Luanda is the most expensive city in the world.

 

Largest housing development in the world

 

 

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Luanda is planning on building a new Metro system

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6. Nairobi 6.5 million

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An established hub for business and culture, Nairobi is Kenya’s capital and the largest city in the country. Home to thousands of Kenyan businesses and over 100 major international companies and organisations, including the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the main coordinating and headquarters for the UN in Africa and Middle East, the United Nations Office in Nairobi (UNON) – Nairobi is now one of the most prominent cities in Africa, both politically and financially.

 

is the capital and largest city of Kenya. It is famous for having the Nairobi National Park, the world’s only game reserve found within a major city.

The name “Nairobi” comes from the Maasai phrase Enkare Nairobi, which translates to “cool water”. The phrase is also the Maasai name of the Nairobi river, which in turn lent its name to the city. However, it is popularly known as the “Green City in the Sun”, and is surrounded by several expanding villa suburbs.[2]

Nairobi was founded in 1899 by the colonial authorities in British East Africa, as a rail depot on the Uganda Railway.[3] The town quickly grew to replace Machakos as the capital of Kenya in 1907. After independence in 1963, Nairobi became the capital of the Republic of Kenya.[4] During Kenya’s colonial period, the city became a centre for the colony’s coffee, tea and sisal industry.[5] The city lies on the River Athi in the southern part of the country, and has an elevation of 1,795 metres (5,889 ft) above sea level.[6]

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With a population of about 3.36 million estimated in 2011, Nairobi is the second-largest city by population in the African Great Lakes region after Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.[1][7] According to the 2009 census, in the administrative area of Nairobi, 3,138,295 inhabitants lived within 696 km2 (269 sq mi).[8] Nairobi is the 14th-largest city in Africa, including the population of its suburbs.

Nairobi is one of the most prominent cities in Africa, both politically and financially.[9] Home to thousands of Kenyan businesses and over 100 major international companies and organisations, including the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the main coordinating and headquarters for the UN in Africa and Middle East, the United Nations Office at Nairobi (UNON), Nairobi is an established hub for business and culture. The Nairobi Securities Exchange (NSE) is one of the largest in Africa and the second-oldest exchange on the continent. It is Africa’s fourth-largest exchange in terms of trading volume, capable of making 10 million trades a day.[10] The Globalization and World Cities Study Group and Network (GaWC) defines Nairobi as a prominent social centre

Nairobi is currently building what will be Africa’s next tallest building

The 300 meter 984 feet Hass Jabavu Towers

Nairobi is fast becoming Africa’s major IT hub

Nairobi is connected by a commuter rail system

Nairobi is also home to Africa’s biggest slum Kibera home to 1 million people

However there are have been many revitalizations

Kibera Slum Revitalization

 

 

 

Richest areas- Muthaiga, Karen, Langata, Runda, Nyari, Gigiri

Poorest areas- Kibera ( Largest slum in Africa)

 

6. Abidjan 6.2 million

Novotel-abidjan-map

 

 

Originally a coastal fishing village, today Abidjan is a West African cultural hub as well as the former political capital and primary economic centre of Cote d’Ivoire. Following the completion of the Vridi canal, which connected the city on the Ébrié lagoon to the Atlantic Ocean, Abidjan’s place as a trading centre was secured.

is the economic capital of Ivory Coast and is the most populous French-speaking city in West Africa. Its population at the 2014 Ivory Coast census was 4,707,404, which is 20 percent of the overall population of the country. Only Lagos, the former capital of Nigeria, surpasses it within West Africa in population. Considered the cultural crossroads of West Africa, Abidjan is characterized by a high level of industrialization and urbanization.

The city grew up quickly after the construction of a new wharf in 1931 and its designation as the capital city of the then-French colony in 1933. The completion of the Vridi Canal in 1951 enabled it to become an important sea port. In 1983 Yamoussoukro was designated as the official capital city of Ivory Coast, but almost all political institutions and foreign embassies are still in Abidjan.

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3500

Proposed-Stadium-for-Ivory-Coast

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Richest areas-Cocody, Treichville

Poorest areas- Adjame

 

7. Khartoum 5.5 million

 

The capital is a modern city with an ever-increasing number of glass tower blocks built. It is built where the two Niles meet – where the White Nile, flowing north from Lake Victoria, and the Blue Nile, flowing west from Ethiopia come together. The huge, spread-out city is actually made out of three distinct cities; Khartoum, Khartoum North or Bahri, and Omdurman, which are divided by the Nile and its two arms.

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is the capital and second largest city of Sudan and Khartoum state. It is located at the confluence of the White Nile, flowing north from Lake Victoria, and the Blue Nile, flowing west from Ethiopia. The location where the two Niles meet is known as the المقرن “al-Mogran“, meaning the Confluence. The main Nile continues to flow north towards Egypt and the Mediterranean Sea.

Divided by the Niles, Khartoum is a tripartite metropolis with an estimated overall population of over five million people, consisting of Khartoum proper, and linked by bridges to Khartoum North (الخرطوم_بحري al-Kharṭūm Baḥrī ) and Omdurman (أم درمان Umm Durmān ) to the west.

 

Largest suburbs – Omdurman

Richest areas- Al Riyadh

Poorest areas- Umbadda

8. Dar Es Salaam 5.3 million

Coral-beach-club-map

 

Started as a fishing village in the mid-19th century, Dar es Salaam is seen as the capital city of Tanzania in everything but name. Once the capital, it is the country’s largest and richest city, the locus of central government bureaucracy and a regionally important economic center. Located on the East African coast, it has become one of East Africa’s most important ports and trading centers.

Dar Es Salaam is one of Africa’s fastest growing cities

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Dār as-Salām, literally “the residence of peace”; or simply Dar, formerly Mzizima) is the largest city of Tanzania and the largest city in eastern Africa by population, as well as a regionally important economic centre.[1] It is Tanzania’s most prominent city in arts, fashion, media, music, film and television. It is Tanzania’s leading financial centre with the Dar es Salaam Stock Exchange (DSE) being the country’s first and most important stock exchange market.[2]

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Dar es Salaam is the largest and most populous Swahili speaking city in the world. It is the capital of the Dar es Salaam Region administrative province and consists of three boroughs or administrative districts: northern Kinondoni, central Ilala, and southern Temeke. The city is the leading arriving and leaving point for most tourists who visit tourism areas in Tanzania like the national parks for safaris and the islands of Zanzibar. The region had a population of 4,364,541 as of the official 2012 census.[3]:page: 2 Although Dar es Salaam lost its status as the nation’s capital to Dodoma in 1974 (not completed until 1996), it remains the focus of the permanent central government bureaucracy. Most decisions made by people in power within the city of Dar es Salaam affect the entire nation of Tanzania.

Tanzania BRT

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Many new condos are being built

04 Dar Es Salaam Tembea Tanzania

Stopping point for Zanzibar

 

Richest areas- Peninsula, Northern District

Poorest areas- Msasena

 

9. Algiers 5 million

 

is the capital and largest city of Algeria. According to the 1998 census, the population of the city proper was 1,519,570 and that of the urban agglomeration was 2,135,630.[1] In 2009, the population was about 3,500,000. An estimate put the population at about 3,574,000 in 2010. Algiers is located on the Mediterranean Sea and in the north-central portion of Algeria.[2]

Sometimes nicknamed El-Behdja (البهجة) or alternatively Alger la Blanche (“Algiers the White”) for the glistening white of its buildings as seen rising up from the sea, Algiers is situated on the west side of a bay of the Mediterranean Sea. The modern part of the city is built on the level ground by the seashore; the old part, the ancient city of the deys, climbs the steep hill behind the modern town and is crowned by the casbah or citadel, 122 metres (400 ft) above the sea. The casbah and the two quays form a triangle

 

Algiers is home to the largest company in Africa Sonatrach.

 

 

Richest areas- Oran, Constantine, Setif

Poorest areas- ?

 

10. Addis Ababa 4.6 million

 

 

 

Also known as the “Political Capital of Africa”, the capital city of Ethiopia is where the African Union and its predecessor the OAU are based. This thriving metropolis hosts the headquarters of the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA) and numerous international organisations.

 

is the capital city of Ethiopia. Founded in 1886, it is the largest city in Ethiopia, with a population of 3,384,569 according to the 2007 population census with annual growth rate of 3.8%. This number has been increased from the originally published 2,738,248 figure and appears to be still largely underestimated.[2][5]

As a chartered city (ras gez astedader), Addis Ababa has the status of both a city and a state. It is where the African Union is and its predecessor the OAU was based. It also hosts the headquarters of the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) and numerous other continental and international organizations. Addis Ababa is therefore often referred to as “the political capital of Africa” due to its historical, diplomatic and political significance for the continent.[6]

The city is populated by people from different regions of Ethiopia – the country has as many as 80 nationalities speaking 80 languages and belonging to a wide variety of religious communities. It is home to Addis Ababa University. The Federation of African Societies of Chemistry (FASC) and Horn of Africa Press Institute (HAPI) are also headquartered in Addis Ababa.

 

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New Airport plans to be worlds busiest with 120 million passengers

 

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Addis Metro

Bole Lemi industrial zone

Unlike others, it is not driven by natural resources, but large public investments with foreign money.

Largest suburbs – Bole

Richest areas- Mekaniza

Poorest areas- Most districts

 

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