Countries that receive the most foreign aid

1. Ethiopia – $3.261 billion

Ethiopia remains the largest recipient of international aid in Africa by a long shot, receiving more than $3 billion in 2012. The country reported a gross domestic product of $46.87 billion in 2013. It has an average gross national income per capita of $470 for its 94.10 million people, of whom 29.6 percent live below the poverty line. Development aid in Ethiopia is targeted at building a more extensive infrastructure for agricultural production, which would help target food insecurity and hopefully decrease poverty within the country. Ethiopia’s Growth and Transformation plan, outlined by the government in 2010, hopes to have the country reach middle-income status by 2015

– See more at: http://afkinsider.com/66655/biggest-recipients-foreign-aid-africa/11/#sthash.kJDH1W2Y.dpuf

2. Democratic Republic of Congo – $2.859 billion

The Democratic Republic of Congo had a gross domestic product of $30.63 billion in 2013, with an average gross national income per capita of $400. Of its 67.51 million people, 71.3 percent live below the poverty line and DRC is classed as a low-income, developing country. The DRC remains a fragile state, enduring active conflict within its borders for more than a decade, and much of the foreign aid that flows there is directed towards humanitarian initiatives. The persistent presence of armed groups and inadequate infrastructure make it difficult for the government to serve its people, and foreign aid seeks to establish a more stable and healthy state and democracy with its funding.

3. Tanzania – $2.831 billion

Tanzania had a gross domestic product of $33.23 billion in 2013, but 28.2 percent of its population of 49.25 million people lives below the poverty line, with an average gross national income per capita of $630. Approximately 33 percent of government spending is financed by foreign aid, but the country continues to be plagued by aid ineffectiveness. Several projects were launched as recently as 2007 in an attempt to increase effectiveness and transparency of aid, as well as the government’s project and planning capacity. These projects include the Joint Assistance Strategy (JAST) and the Aid Management Platform (AMP).

4. Kenya – $2.654 billion

Kenya’s $4.10 billion gross domestic product in 2013 resulted in a gross national income per capita of $930, classifying it as a low-income, developing country. Of the population of 44.35 million people, 45.9 percent live below the poverty line. While Kenya is not dependent on aid to have a functioning economy, it does need donor funds to help bolster development spending. Approximately 15 percent of Kenya’s public expenditures are financed by foreign aid, but the country maintains a strong annual revenue performance and is able to finance most of its public services through taxpayer money.

5. Côte d’Ivoire – $2.635 billion

The lower middle-income, developing country of Côte d’Ivoire had a gross domestic product of $30.91 billion in 2013, with a gross national income per capita of $1,380. Of its 20.32 million people, 42.7 percent live below the poverty line. Unfortunately, like many other countries, Côte d’Ivoire struggles with lack of transparency when it comes to allocating foreign aid, and donors are often frustrated by apparent corruption and bad governance that leads to misappropriation of funds meant for socioeconomic growth

6. Mozambique – $2.096 billion

The $15.32 billion gross domestic product of Mozambique in 2013 classifies it as a low-income, developing country, and 54.7 perceny of its 25.83-strong population lives below the poverty line. Mozambique has an average gross national income per capita of $590. Some foreign aid donors have moved towards reallocating aid towards providing budget support and strengthening the capacity of state institutions, rather than project aid, with the intention of drawing down aid in years to come.

7. Nigeria – $1.915 billion

Nigeria, the most populous country in Africa with 173.6 million people, had a gross domestic product of $522.6 billion in 2013. However, 46 percent of the country lives below the poverty line, with an average gross national income per capita of $2,760. Despite Nigeria’s large oil revenues and a growing economy, it continues to struggle with many socioeconomic problems. Furthermore, the involvement of the Nigerian military in many conflicts across the country means it needs continued international aid.

8. Ghana – $1.807 billion

Ghana had a gross domestic product of $47.93 billion in 2013, making it a lower middle-income developing country. It has a population of 25.90 people, and 28.5 percent of its citizens live below the poverty line with an average gross national income per capita of $1,760. Ghana’s democracy has been lauded across Africa and the world for its stability and commitment to fair elections, and much of the international aid directed to Ghana has been geared towards maintaining and promoting further democratization

– See more at: http://afkinsider.com/66655/biggest-recipients-foreign-aid-africa/4/#sthash.LHD2NtI9.dpuf

9. Egypt – $1.806 billion

Egypt’s gross domestic product of $272 billion in 2013 classifies it as a lower middle-income, developing country. It has a population of 82.06 million people, and 25.2 percent live below the poverty line. Throughout the uprising in Egypt, much had been discussed about revising the aid that is sent to the country, but most donor countries agreed to continue aid so as not to damage civil society or create a vacuum in the government that could be filled by more dangerous actors.

– See more at: http://afkinsider.com/66655/biggest-recipients-foreign-aid-africa/3/#sthash.Sf106JIp.dpuf

10. Uganda – $1.655 billion Uganda’s gross domestic product, listed at $21.48 billion in 2013, classifies it as a low-income, developing country. Of the 37.58 million population, 24.5 percent live below the national poverty line. Uganda has seen some of its foreign aid cut by countries protesting its recent passage of a anti-homosexuality law, including the Netherlands, Norway, and Denmark. Many countries are restructuring their aid programs away from the government and towards civic, nongovernmental groups. – See more at: http://afkinsider.com/66655/biggest-recipients-foreign-aid-africa/2/#sthash.oj4r8pgL.dpuf

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