How to be or become a good worker

It’s not complicated; it just requires a decision and commitment on your part to make it happen. Here are some starter tips for making your manager’s life—and job—easier on a daily basis.

1. Get to Know Your Manager

You can’t make your boss’ life easier if you don’t understand how he or she fundamentally operates. So, your first step is to figure out what he needs from you—and how you should deliver it.

Does he prefer updates delivered in written form or verbally? Spreadsheets or PowerPoint slides? Does he want information conveyed via email, during a team meeting, or on a voicemail?

Getting to know your manager and his preferences will help you deliver the information he needs, the way he needs it. And who doesn’t appreciate that?

2. Know Your Boss’ Goals

As an employee, you may be so focused on your own goals that you forget that you’re actually there to support your manager achieving her goals. So, make it your job to understand the goals, numbers, projects, and other deliverables your boss is accountable for.

It’s as simple as asking your manager as part of your one-on-one meetings, “If I’m aware of your goals and priorities, I can better support you in achieving them. Can you share these with me, so that I can help you succeed?” Once you understand her goals, you’ll be able to produce deliverables that support her success.

3. Never Let Your Manager Be Blindsided

One rule I always asked my teams to abide by was to never let me be blindsided. In short: No surprises.

So, if you suspect that one of your customers is getting really ticked off and is about to escalate over you—and over your boss—to the VP of customer service, you need to let your manager know. Otherwise, she’ll be completely blindsided by the situation, unprepared to handle it, and likely, not too happy with you.

A blindside creates frustration and chaos that usually ends up in a major time-wasting fire drill. Avoid it, and believe me, your manager will thank you.

4. Don’t Expect Your Boss to Spoon-Feed You

It may sound harsh, but no manager wants to babysit an employee. So if you have questions about health insurance, where to find the pencils, or how to file an expense report, find a colleague who can help you get your answers.

Save one-on-one time with your boss for work-related matters that require collaboration; issues that allow you to flex your intellectual muscles and prove your worth as an employee.

5. Meet (or Beat!) Your Deadlines

When you get an assignment from your manager, enthusiastically commit to the deadline (this means “I’m on it!” not, “I’ll see what I can do”). Then, aim to deliver it at least a day early.

This gives your boss time to flex and adapt in case something comes up—and it always does—rather than sweating it out for you to deliver something at the very last minute.

6. Offer Solutions, Not Problems

Your job is not to constantly point out problems that arise, but rather, to proactively start thinking about what solutions could help address those challenges.

For example, you should never walk into your boss’ office to complain about how the shipping department can never get anything out on time. Instead, you should first go to the shipping department, have a conversation about what can be done to improve the situation, and see what you can do to help.

Then, when you do go to your boss about it, you’ll be able to let him or her know the action you’ve already taken to start solving the problem.

7. Do What You Say; Say What You Do

If you say you’ll finish a report by Friday for the team update, but you come in Friday morningunprepared because “other things came up,” people will probably complain to your manager.

And if that’s not enough, if your manager was counting on that report to take the next steps on a project or to present to the executive team, it will inconvenience (read: annoy) him or her even further.

People who are accountable for their actions and follow up on their commitments are dream employees—and their bosses know they can count on them, no matter what.

Employees who work to make their managers successful are golden. Your manager has a tough job—the stress and pressure of which may not be abundantly evident to you. So, help your manager out and develop your own skills at the same time, by doing everything you can to make your boss’ job easier. When you’re a manager, you’ll appreciate the same.

7 Ways to Become Your Boss’ Dream Employee | The Muse

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